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Grilled Slaw Is A Thing

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Spring is here and the grill is out!!!  I was recently at my friends apartment that I spend a good amount of time at.  We BBQ a lot in the warm months of the year and are always trying new things on the grill.  Last weekend we grilled cabbage to make a grilled coleslaw.  It was tremendous!!!   But as most of you know I will through anything on the grill.  Grilled celery anyone?  Don’t knock it till you try it.   I’m sure there a lot’s of people who feel the same way I do about grilling everything and anything.  So I am sure you will have no problem with this warm version of slaw.  We used only red cabbage instead of the usual red and green.  I cut the red cabbage lengthwise, about 1/4 – 1/2 inch slices, with the core to keep the slices intact.  I left the carrots whole, peeled and cut the onion into rings.  When everything was done I did a rough chop of the veggies, giving them a rustic feel.  When grilling just use a small amount of olive oil on the cabbage.  This makes it so you won’t have to use a lot of mayo, which is usually essential in a good slaw.  We used a garlic mayo and minced capers for our dressing.  You could also leave out the capers, squeeze a lime and chop some cilantro with the garlic mayo for a different version.  Even add a little red pepper flakes for some heat.  Or whatever your heart desires.  I find grilling things opens my creative mind to different ways of preparing and eating food.  I hope this inspires you to explore and start grilling in different ways!!!

 

 

Grill Slaw Is A Thing
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This is a great way to have a healthier side dish but keeping a bbq staple that everyone loves.
Ingredients
  • 1 Head red cabbage
  • 1 Onion - white, yellow or red
  • 2-3 Large carrots
  • 2-3 Tbsp of Garlic Mayo
  • A Handful of Capers
  • Olive oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. Cut cabbage length wise and keep core intact about ¼-1/2 inch thick.
  2. Peel and slice onion into rings.
  3. Wash carrots thoroughly, and dry them.
  4. Lightly coat onions, carrots and cabbage with olive oil, salt and pepper.
  5. Carrots take a little while so start them first.
  6. Grill veggies till desired doneness.
  7. I usually only flip the onions and cabbage once during grilling.
  8. Gives them a nice grilled sear marks.
  9. While veggies are cooking mince the capers.
  10. When done, cut core out of cabbage and trough away.
  11. Then give a rough chop to all veggies.
  12. I still like to cut the carrots in strings but am not so precise with the chopping.
  13. Toss with mayo and capers.
  14. Salt and pepper to taste.
Notes
The grilling time is approximate. It all depends on your grill and how cooked you want the veggies.

Potato Leek Soup

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Potato leek soup is such a staple in restaurants and kitchens that it seems impossible to improve on it.  Most of the time it’s potatoes, shop leeks, stock, cream and buttermilk or just cream.  I dont use cream or buttermilk, but add a carrot, celery and garlic.  I not sure this is an improvement, but its just way I do it.  Like a lot of recipes, it comes from a mistake.  I was making a bunch of soups(winter does that to me) and they called for a carrot and celery.  So of course I addded them to my potato leek soup.   Oops!  Not normal.  But it was for a dinner party and everyone liked it, so I kept on making it that way, and still do!  Of course now I add garlic.  Always tweaking the recipe.  I can’t help it!

Potato Leek Soup

 

Potato Leek Soup
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Recipe type: Soup
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Serves: 6-8 cups
 
Ingredients
  • 2 Large leeks, white to light green part
  • 4 Small or 2 large potatoes
  • 1 Carrot
  • 1 Celery rib
  • 2 Cloves of garlic
  • 2 Tbsp butter
  • Olive oil
  • 4 Cups of chicken stock or vegetable stock
  • Salt and pepper
Instructions
  1. Cut dark green and very bottom of white off
  2. Slice in half and give a good rinse
  3. Get in between the layers
  4. Chop across
  5. Peel and chop carrots, set aside
  6. Chop celery, set aside
  7. Chop garlic and separate
  8. Peel and chop potatoes into small pieces
  9. In large stock pot add butter and a couple tablespoons of olive oil
  10. Heat until butter is melted
  11. Add leeks and sauté till they start to wilt/translucent
  12. Add some salt and pepper
  13. Add one clove of garlic while leeks are cooking
  14. When leeks start to look translucent and smell, add carrots and celery
  15. Lower heat to medium and cook for about 5 minutes
  16. Add potatoes and rest of the garlic
  17. Cook for about 5 minutes
  18. Add stock
  19. Bring to boil and turn down to a simmer
  20. Cook till potatoes are soft, about 10 to 15 minutes
  21. Check to see if all veggies are soft
  22. If veggies are soft turn of heat and let cool enough to blend
  23. Blend till smooth, reheat and serve

Chicken Barley and Vegetable Soup

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I wasn’t going to do another chicken soup post, diagnosis but after requests for this recipe and some thought, diagnosis I realized that this is different then the last chicken soup I wrote about.  While I was writing, for sale I wondered how many versions of chicken soup must be out there?  I have at least 3 to 4 myself.   I will post more as they get remade or made for the first time.  Until then, here is another addition to the cannon of probably the most American soup out there.  I give you, my other chicken soup, which I will officially call; Chicken, barley and vegetable soup.

Chicken, Barley and Vegetable Soup
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Recipe type: Main
Cuisine: American
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Serves: 4-6
 
Ingredients
  • 2 chicken breasts
  • 4 cups chicken stock
  • 1 lg onion or 3 small
  • 4 carrots
  • 4 ribs of celery
  • 1 zucchini
  • 1 can of corn
  • 1 cup cooked barley
  • 2-3 bay leafs (1 or 2 if big)
  • 3-4 cloves of garlic
  • Couple sprigs of Savory
  • 1 Tablespoon of garlic chives chopped
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Olive oil
Instructions
  1. Chop onion, separate into thirds or if you have three small onions keep separated
  2. Peel and chop carrots
  3. Chop celery and zucchini.
  4. Open corn and drain liquid
  5. Sautée ⅓ or one of the small onions in olive oil, salt and pepper
  6. Salt and pepper both breasts in same pan as onions, on medium high heat place breasts skin side down
  7. Cook for a couple minutes, or until you get a good sear.
  8. Flip breasts over cover and cook on low till done.
  9. Check every once in a while to make sure they don't burn
  10. Meanwhile cook barley according to directions, minus 5-10 minutes - it will fully cook later when you add it to the rest of the soup.
  11. Once chicken is done set on a plate to cool
  12. You should have some good drippings left in the pan.
  13. Add another third of onions and a handful of carrots and celery and sautée
  14. When onion is translucent add this to your stock pot, along with broth and veggies
  15. When chicken has cooled off tear from bones (using the skin is up to you, I love it).
  16. Add chicken and barley to soup.
  17. Add savory and garlic chives to soup
  18. Bring to boil then lower to a slow simmer for about 10 minutes or until veggies are how you like and barley is done.

 

Good for What Ails You

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What Ails You Chicken Soup
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Recipe type: Soup
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4-6
 
Ingredients
  • 1 chicken
  • 1 bouquets garnis
  • 3-4 quarts of water (enough to submerge a chicken)
  • 1 onion
  • 2 ribs of celery
  • 3 carrots
  • 2-3 cloves of garlic, diagnosis peeled and chopped
  • salt and pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. Take out bag of innards from chicken
  2. Rinse the chicken and take any extra feathers off
  3. Place in pot with water
  4. Add salt, information pills pepper, garlic and bouquets garnis
  5. Bring to boil, then lower heat to medium
  6. Cover and simmer for about 20 minutes
  7. Meanwhile peel and cut carrots into ¼" slices, set aside
  8. Chop celery and onion, set aside
  9. When chicken is done remove and let stand and cool
  10. While chicken is cooling off put veggies in the broth
  11. Bring to boil then simmer for 10-15 minutes
  12. When chicken is ready to handle, peel the skin, chop it up and set aside
  13. Strip chicken of all meat, tear into desired size pieces, set aside.
  14. Add chicken and skin when veggies are done.
  15. Bring soup back to a slow simmer and serve.
Notes
You can add rice, noodles, or barley, just make sure you cook these before adding them. I like to cook them just under the desired time so they finish in the soup. Bouquets Garnis is Oregano, Thyme and Savory wrapped up in Bay Leaves tied with kitchen string. I use this in all my stocks and soups. It is a great time saver and adds the perfect amount of flavor. You can make these yourself or get them at http://www.oliviersandco.com/ or at one of their stores.

Image01052013152900 chickensoupstuff

Chicken broth and chicken soup are said to be good for what ails you.  So with the Flu being particularly bad this year, and Jason being struck down by it, I decided to make chicken soup.  Years ago I got a tip from a mother from Catalan Spain.  She said to boil a chicken with one or two cloves of garlic.   Strip the chicken of it’s meat and put back in the pot.  Then serve.  She also pointed out that the skin must be in there also.  It supposedly has healing properties.   Being one who does not argue with mothers, especially when they come from my ancestral homeland,  I nodded my head and said yes ma’am.  Of course I asked if I should add anything else?  Salt and pepper, nothing else was her short but firm answer.  Keep it simple, it’s what the body needs.  Well, if you know me, then you know I can’t help but tinker with a recipe.   I have added a few things, like bouquets garnis, onions, celery, carrots  etc.  I’ve also been known to throw in some ginger, barley, rice, cilantro and even alphabet noodles.   Now I understand the reasoning for keeping it simple, it makes sense, and I have made it that way and it is very good.  What I find when I am asked to make chicken soup  is that everyone has something special they like in it.  This last time was the alphabet noodles.  Whether you like it simple or complex, there is one thing that does seem to cure or at least make being sick bearable, that’s homemade chicken soup.  I feel the most important healing thing about making this soup isn’t just fresh ingredients, but the care that comes with it.  Maybe that’s what the healing properties are.

On a Sunday Afternoon

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What did you do this last Sunday?  Jason went camping and I stayed at home to learn computer stuff.  Sounds boring doesn’t it?  Not really.  I expanded my brain with knowledge and did some, physician (a long time coming) slow cooking.  I made chicken stock and pinto bean soup.  It may not sound like much but both are long, but relatively easy tasks.  I had the makings for stock sitting in the freezer for way too long and finally had the time to make it.  There’s a reason most people buy their stock from a store.   That’s not to say I don’t like homemade stock, quite the opposite.  I love it!  But don’t always have the time to make it.  Another issue is I don’t cook mine as long as some people, or chefs, simply because I’m too impatient.  That’s probably why my stock is very strong and usually cloudy.   I did come across an article on how to make a quick chicken stock and can’t wait to try it.  I will let you know how it turns out.  If it’s as good as it looks then I may never buy chicken stock again!!!  Hahaha, not likely, but maybe I will make more at home.

Now, what did I do with that chicken stock you ask?  I made cauliflower soup!!!  I took six cups of stock, a couple ribs of celery, two carrot’s, a medium onion and a head of cauliflower chopped them up and put them on the stove to simmer for 20 minutes(after bringing it to a boil) and next thing you know lunch was served!

One of the other things I did  was make Pinto Bean Soup.  This is something I had learned from my grandparents.  It was my grandfathers favorite soup and my father’s least favorite.  I first got to taste this hearty goodness when we were living with my grandparents one winter when I was young.  I remember paying attention to how it was made but not really understanding what I was seeing.  It all happened so fast.   My biggest memory is that when it’s done you must add pepper and very finely minced onion.  Something my grandfather took pride in doing.  My father always said it was tasteless soup.  I beg to differ.  The earthiness of the beans and the cloudy stock made smokey from the bacon and the tender cooked onions melt in your mouth, while the fresh onions provide a nice crisp sweet freshness that is to me, pure heaven.  I don’t have the exact recipe just what my father told me as he finally made it one day, after months of begging.   He made it from memory and since he only made it once I had to learn quick.  It’s a very simple soup and there really is no measuring, which is probably where I get my cooking method from.   I’ve asked lots of friends and family about this soup and how they make it.  Everyone seems to make it mostly the same way, soak the beans overnight then rinse them, put back in the slow cooker and cook for several hours.  Some of the other ingredients people added were bacon, onions,  celery, carrots, garlic, a ham hawk or what ever there mother/grandmother use to use to get it just right.  My version is simple with bacon, onion and garlic.   I like to make a couple times so I have  it  on hand all winter for those long cold days and evenings.  Not a bad way to spend a Sunday.

 

 

Blood Soup

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Usually this time of year I hit a few Halloween parties or at least a pumpkin carving party. Unfortunately I only made it to one this year and didn’t have time to make anything. Also our wonderful guest Hurricane Sandy payed a visit and literally put a damper on the festivities. So now it’s the day after Halloween and I am finally getting around to making my famous blood soup. This years will be a little different as I am adding yellow and orange carrots. I wanted to make it lighter and challenge myself to do something different. I went to the local farmers market and grabbed my supplies, a large red beet, a bunch of yellow carrots and a medium onion. I already had the orange carrots and chicken stock at home. Now as some of you know I don’t always measure what I’m making. Especially if it’s the first time. So if you want to make this you must be brave. Also it’s pretty easy if you can guesstimate while your cooking. Like I said a couple sentences ago, I used one large beet, peeled and chopped into small pieces, four medium to large yellow carrots also peeled, two regular size orange carrots, again peeled, plus one medium yellow onion. They are now sitting in around 6-7 cups of chicken stock waiting to boil, with salt and pepper for taste. I usually roast the veggies, especially the beets, but like I said I am trying something new. I also usually top it off with sour cream and pico de gallo, but tonight it will be chopped honey crisp apples. The veggies will simmer till soft, it should only take about 20-30 minutes. Then we will cool the soup off and then blend it. Now, if you are adventurous, try this one out and let us know what you think. Remember, all these measurements are approximate. If not then don’t worry, you can email us later and we will give you the measured out version as soon as we finalize it.